Lordship Titles over £3,000

This is a selection of the lordship titles we have available. If you cannot find the right title below we can search our databases for other options. We are here to assist.

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Lordship Title of Huntingdon Fee

County: Northamptonshire

Parish: Wootton

History from: Pre-Conquest

History to: 1635

Of interest…

Leofnoth (son of Osmund) is a thegn (nobleman) to Edward the Confessor and owns 22 manors in Northamptonshire. After the Conquest all but one of his manors is taken from him and Huntingdon Fee is granted to Winemar of Flanders, a companion of William the Conqueror. It is part of a larger grant of the Barony of Hanslope. His grandson having no male heir takes an unusual approach to his inheritance granting the barony to King Henry so that is stays together. Huntingdon Fee passes to Walter Mauduit through Michael's daughter Maud. Walter's grandson becomes High Sheriff of Northamptonshire and later is granted custody of Fotheringay Castle. In King John's dispute with the barons Walter sides with the barons and has all his lands confiscated. With King Henry taking the throne Walter's lands including Huntingdon Fee are returned. King Henry also makes a gift of six does from Salcey Forest to stock Walter's park at Preston. Walter is employed to assess the fifteenth (for taxation) in Warwickshire and Leicestershire. He also fixes the tallage (taxation of Crown lands) in Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire and Bedfordshire. Walter's son Gilbert is appointed a justice itinerant (mobile judge) on the southern circuit. Gilbert rises to become one of the most senior judges in England. He is appointed Head of the Justices Itinerant for various counties. He becomes Chief Justice of the Court of Common Pleas in England.
Price: £3,950 to become the 21st Lord and Lady of Huntingdon Fee (Being sold on behalf of a client)

Lordship Title of Nether Court

County: Surrey

Parish: Woldingham

History from: 1294

History to: 1808

Of interest…

The first known lord of Nether Court is John de Walton who receives a grant to hunt Royal game in the manor. John dies whilst his heir Joan, is still a minor. She is made a ward of King Edward. The fifth lord is Sir Thomas de Uvedale who is sent by King Edward to arrange the marriage of King Edward's son Edmund, Earl of Cambridge to Margaret, daughter of the Count of Flanders. In 1367 he is elected a Knight of the Shire and Member of Parliament for Surrey. His son John serves several terms as High Sheriff of Hampshire or Surrey. He is elected a Knight of the Shire and Member of Parliament for Hampshire. His son also named John serves as High Sheriff of Hampshire and is elected a Knight of the Shire and Member of Parliament for Hampshire. In 1436 John makes a loan to the Crown of £30 (worth £33,633 today) towards the war effort in France.
Price: £3,500 to becomes the 22nd Lord and Lady of Nether Court

Lordship Title of Didderston

County: North Yorkshire

Parish: Melsonby

History from: Pre 1066

History to: 1699

Of interest…

The 1st lord of Didderston was Thorfin (the horse thegn of the Earl of Northumbria). He was wealthy in his own right holding 58 lordships. The 2nd lord was Bodin who becomes a monk. The 5th lord was Hervy Fitz Akaris who was appointed the Forster of the New Forest. The 9th lord was Sir Hugh Fitz Henry who fought against both the Welsh and the Scots. He was included in King Edwards military councils. After the dissolution of the priories Didderston is granted by Henry VIII to Matthew, Earl of Lennox. The 13th lord was Edward Bruce of Kinloss, an ambassador to England and he played a key role in the accession of King James. He is appointed Master of the Rolls for life. Sir Edward dies in a duel with Sir Edward Sackville 4th Earl of Dorset. The 15th lord of Didderston attends King Charles at his coronation in Scotland and is created Earl of Elgin. The 17th lord Thomas Bruce is a Knight of the Shire and Member of Parliament for Wiltshire. He serves as a Page of Honour at the coronation of King James. In 1695 Thomas accompanies King James when he flees London. His arrested and imprisoned in the Tower of London for conspiring to bring James back onto the throne. Thomas is released on bail and lives out 40 years of exile in Brussels. He was the last lord of Didderston.
Price: £3,250 to become 18th Lord and Lady of Didderston

Lordship Title of Cotes Bidun

County: Northamptonshire

Parish: Raunds

History from: Before 1066

History to: 1629

Of interest…

Before the Norman Conquest Cotes Bidun was held by Burgred (father of Edwin) who had extensive holdings in Northamptonshire and Buckinghamshire. It passes to Geoffrey, Bishop of Countances who grants six lordships, one of which is to his steward William. Before 1100 Cotes Bidun passes to John (son of Halenath de Bidun) who is also the feudal Baron of Lavendon. In 1184 his son also John dies and after the dower of his wife Cotes Bidun and the barony are split into moieties (shares) for his five sisters. Uncommonly the five moieties are acquired by John de Gatesden, reforming the lordship. He is in the service of the Earl of Lancaster. In mid sixteenth century Cotes Bidun is acquired by Sir William Fitz William (a former High Sheriff of London). In 1626 Sir John Pickering is lord and is elected a Knight of the Shire and Member of Parliament for Northamptonshire. Only a year later he falls from grace when he refuses to pay the Forced Loan to King Charles and is imprisoned. He is released as he is suspected of having tuberculosis and dies in 1629. A rare find to know of 26 previous lords, the new owner of the titles will be the 27th Lord and Lady of Cotes Bidun.
Price: £3,250 to become 27th Lord and Lady of Cotes Bidun

Lordship Title of West Bockhampton

County: Berkshire

Parish: Lambourn

History from: 1066 - Pre Conquest

History to: 1778

Of interest…

This has probably one of the longest known histories we can offer, covering 700 years and 30 Lords. Prior to the Conquest three free men held three lordships but these were combined by William the Conqueror. In 1361 Sir Henry Tyes dies and he leaves West Bockhampton to his nephew Baron Lisle. He dies 21 years later and leaves a daughter Margaret who is married to Sir Thomas, Lord Berkeley "the Magnificent". Their daughter Elizabeth inherits and marries Richard 13th Earl of Warwick. She dies with no male heir so her three daughters inherit a third of her estate each. Margaret inherits West Bockhampton with the Barony of Lisle. Her husband John is later created Viscount Lisle. John is a soldier and storms Berkley Castle taking Baron Berkley and his sons prisoners. He is not as successful in the last battle of the Hundred Years War at Castillon where he is killed on the battlefield. The family has lost Berkley Castle but his son Thomas tries to take it back. Thomas challenges Lord Berkley to a trial by arms but he refuses. The ensuing Battle of Nibley Green is the last private battle in English history. This takes us up to the 15th Lord of West Bockhampton, I shall leave you to read the last 15 lords fascinating history.
Price: £3,950 to becomes the 31st Lord of West Bockhampton

Lordship Title of Hutton Mynchon

County: Yorkshire

Parish: Hutton Ambro

History from: 1086 - the reign of William the Conqueror

History to: 1689

Of interest…

The first controversial Lord of Hutton Mynchon is John Lokton, who is impeached for his support of Robert de Vere, 1st Duke of Ireland, who led a rebellion against King Richard. He is condemned to a traitor's death by the "Merciless Parliament". This is later commuted to life-long exile in Ireland. The 17th Lord, Thomas Gower, is knighted by the Duke of Gloucester. He dies childless and his brother, who inherits Hutton Mynchon, dies on the field at the Battle of Flodden. The 21st lord, Sir Thomas Gower, is appointed Marshall of Berwick and Wark Castles. He is later appointed Governor of Eyemouth Fort.
Price: £3,500 to become the 24th Lord and Lady of Hutton Mynchon

Lordship Title of Setons or Hutchins

County: Northamptonshire

Parish: Scaldwell

History from: 1086 - the reign of William the Conqueror

History to: 1772 - the reign of George III

Of interest…

There have been 25 previous Lords of Setons or Hutchins. This gives the purchaser the title of 26th Lord and Lady, which demonstrates to parties how old the title is. Setons or Hutchins derives the two alternatives to its name through these two families. Wouldn't it be nice to bring the titles back to one of these families? The lordship derives from a holding held by Countess Judith. She is the niece of William the Conqueror and is used to bring the different parts of England under William's rule. She is married to the Earl of Northumbria to ensure his loyalty. This fails and William ends up executing the Earl. He then tries to marry Judith to Simon de St Liz, 1st Earl of Northampton, but she refuses and William confiscates her lands. Eventually her daughter is married off to Simon.
Price: £3,250 to become the 26th Lord and Lady of Setons or Hutchins.

Lordship Title of Houghtons or Parkes or Atterburys

County: Northamptonshire

Parish: Great Houghton

History from: 1086

History to: 1738

Of interest…

During the centuries that lordships have existed some lords decide to change the name of the lordship and manor. Normally this is to reflect their name, making a personal statement. This lordship reflects three families that held this lordship and offers flexibility to the purchaser to choose the title that appeals to them the most. The 14th lord is the most interesting. He is chaplain to Henry, Duke of Gloucester, but decides to re-train as a lawyer. He continues to preach and is taken by the suffering of his congregation and re-trains again. This time he becomes a doctor so he can serve their medical needs as well as their spiritual ones. Let's hope the future Lord of Houghtons has this same moral fibre.
Price: £3,250 to become the 18th Lord and Lady of Houghtons

Lordship Title of Woodrow

County: Wiltshire

Parish: Melksham

History from: 1250 - The reign of King Henry III

History to: 1683 - The reign of King Charles II

Of interest…

An extensive history starting with the feudal Baron of Thoresway. He dies leaving a daughter, whose husband is banished for a conflict with King Henry. In 1280, Woodrow comes to Queen Eleanor, the wife of Edward "the Longshanks". After Eleanor dies, Woodrow is granted to Margaret on her marriage to King Edward. On her death, Woodrow is granted to Isabel, King Edward II's wife and Queen. In 1397, King Richard II grants Woodrow to two of his esquires. In 1464, the Lord of Woodrow is appointed High Sheriff of Wiltshire. The same lord, Sir Roger Tocotes, fights at the Battle of Bosworth Field with Henry Tudor. Later he serves as a Knight of the Body and Controller of the Household to King Henry. The next lord is Sir Richard, Lord St Amand, who is an officer supervising the official welcome of Katherine of Aragon, King Henry VIII's first wife. Several later Lords of Woodrow are elected to Parliament, and the 24th lord is created Earl of West Morland.

Lordship Title of Coatham or East Coatham

County: North Yorkshire

Parish: Kirkleatham

History from: Pre 1066

History to: 1586

Of interest…

Leising the Saxon holds Coatham with 12 other lordships in Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. After the Conquest, Coatham passes to Robert de Brus, a military companion and friend of King David of Scotland. After the death of King Henry I, Robert sides with King Stephen in the civil war and fights at the Battle of the Standard. Robert's son, Adam, is made Baron of Skelton by King Stephen. In 1200, the 5th lord, Peter de Brus, purchases the barony and forest of Danby from King John. In 1207, Peter creates a "Charter of Liberties", which provides ideas to be included in Magna Carta. The 9th lord, Sir Marmaduke Thweng, achieves fame after the Battle of Sterling Bridge, in which he saves the lives of 100 English knights.
Price: £3,250 to become the 22nd Lord and Lady of Coatham

Lordship Title of Highfield

County: Lancashire

Parish: Lancaster

History from: 1212 - The reign of King John

History to: 1728 - The reign of George II

Of interest…

In 1212, Roger, son of John, is holding the Lordship of Highfield. After the First Barons' War, Highfield is held by Walter, son of Walter the Smith, and William, son of William the Smith, and passes through the families by inheritance and marriage for many years. By the mid 15th century, Highfield is held by the Southworths. Prior to 1552, Highfield has come to George Southworth and he sells various pieces of land from the manor. The last recorded date for Highfield is 1728, where it has been reduced through various sales of land to a very small estate and the lordship is not recorded again. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the 19th Lord and Lady of Highfield

Lordship Title of Hawkley

County: Hampshire

Parish: Hawkley

History from: 1249

History to: 1554

Of interest…

A lordship with history covering 300 years and three families. All the lords were soldiers, many earning knighthoods for bravery and military success. In the thirteenth century, the Lord of Hawkley was free to dispense the king's justice, the sheriff having no authority in the manor.
Price: £3,250 to become the 12th Lord and Lady of Hawkley

Lordship Title of Hawkridge

County: Berkshire

Parish: Bucklebury

History from: 1066 - Norman Conquest

History to: 1798 - the reign of George III

Of interest…

Henry Ferrers, Baron of Tetbury, Staffordshire, a Norman soldier who fought at the Battle of Hastings, is holding Hawkridge at 1086. The lordship is held direct of King William. Henry is also appointed the first Anglo-Norman High Sheriff of Berkshire. Among Henry’s famous descendants are King George I, Princess Diana, George Washington, and Winston Churchill. Hawkridge was part of Sutton, a royal manor held by Edward the Confessor and Godric the Sheriff. It is granted later, in the 15th Century, to Sir Walter Devereux. In 1538, Hawkridge is returned to the Crown after the execution of the lord, Henry Courtenay, Marquess of Exeter. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,850 to become 27th Lord and Lady of Hawkridge

Lordship Title of Stickleton or Greenford

County: Middlesex

Parish: Greenford

History from: 1257 - the reign of Henry III

History to: 1811 - the reign of William IV

Of interest…

The Lordship of Stickleton is part of the honour of Mandeville. Granted to Andrew, Lord Windsor by Henry VIII, Lord Windsor was "Keeper of the Wardrobe". All passes to his heir, William Windsor, who becomes 2nd Baron of Windsor, and then to Edward who was knighted by Queen Mary the day after her coronation. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the 18th Lord and Lady of Stickleton

Lordship Title of Millbrook

County: Bedfordshire

Parish: Millbrook

History from: 1287

History to: 1584

Of interest…

Here is a title for the motoring enthusiasts among you. Although this is a minor lordship in Millbrook parish, the user can still use the title of Lord of Millbrook as well as Millbrook Templar. The name derives from the fact that this lordship was owned by the Knights Templar (the famous warrior clergy). At the beginning of the 14th century, they are hunted down and executed, and their wealth is confiscated, because Pope Clement, and many monarchs throughout Europe, fear their wealth and influence. The Millbrook lordship, like many Templar holdings, passes to the Knights Hospitallers. They had a similar mandate to the Templars; to care for and defend the city of Jerusalem. As they are based in Catholicism, Millbrook is taken into Crown control after the suppression of the monasteries. Millbrook is then granted to Sir Richard Longe, Governor of Guernsey. His son Henry, the 5th Lord of Millbrook, is a godchild of Henry VIII. Henry becomes High Sheriff of Cambridgeshire and Huntingdonshire, then a Knight of the County and Member of Parliament for Cambridgeshire.
Price: £3,500 to become the 6th Lord and Lady of Millbrook

Lordship Title of Southcott

County: Buckinghamshire

Parish: Linslade

History from: 1241 - the reign of Henry III

History to: 1718 - the reign of George I

Of interest…

Southcott is first recorded in 1241. Thomas de Mowbray, Earl of Nottingham, inherits Linsdale, the principle lordship in the parish, from his brother John, and Thomas acquires Southcott Manor. Thomas is created Duke of Norfolk for being instrumental in the murder of King Richard II’s uncle, the Duke of Gloucester, while he is a captain at Calais where the duke is imprisoned. Thomas later quarrels with the Duke of Hereford, and Richard II banishes them both. Sir William is holding the lordship in 1444. He is made High Sheriff of Herefordshire, but is killed in 1460 at the Battle of Northampton. Southcott passes to Sir William Vaux, High Sheriff of Northamptonshire, a zealous Lancastrian, after the Battle of Towton. He is charged with treason. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,850 to become the 23rd Lord and Lady of Southcott

Lordship Title of Thingden and Burton Latimer

County: Northamptonshire

Parish: Finedon

History from: 1066 - Norman Conquest

History to: 1673 - the reign of Charles II

Of interest…

First recorded in 1066, the lordship is held in 3 portions. Prior to the Conquest, the 3 lordships are brought together under the overlordship of Geoffrey, Bishop of Coutances. In 1222, the Abbot of Croxton is granted 27 acres of land in Finedon, and rents from 7 virgates of land in Burton and Finedon. The abbot is famous for taking King John’s confession and, after his death, embalming his body. King John’s heart is buried at Croxton Abbey. Henry VIII grants Thingden and Burton Latimer to Thomas, Earl of Rutland. He is later appointed Lord Chamberlain to Anne of Cleves, Constable of Nottingham Castle, and a Warden of the Marches. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the 16th Lord and Lady of Thingden and Burton Latimer

Lordship Title of Bretts

County: Essex

Parish: Aveley

History from: 1066 - Norman Conquest

History to: 1625 - the reign of Elizabeth 1

Of interest…

At Domesday, the manor is held in overlordship by Lewin as part of the Honour of Rayleigh. In the 15th century, the manor passes to Richard Andrews, to be Dean of York. Recorder of London and later Chancellor of the Exchequer, Sir John Baker, is in possession of the manor in 1531. Full history available under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the next Lord and Lady of Bretts

Lordship Title of Hay

County: Hertfordshire

Parish: Therfield

History from: 1086

History to: 1641

Of interest…

Sir Geoffrey Scrope, the 3rd lord, serves as Edward II's secretary. He was also a knight banneret (leads a company of troops) in the Siege of Tournay. The 4th lord serves as a Member of Parliament for Yorkshire. The 8th lord, Thomas Fitz William, is slain at the Battle of Flodden Field.
Price: £3,850 to become the 15th Lord and Lady of Hay

Lordship Title of Sudbury

County: Bedfordshire

Parish: Eaton Socon

History from: Pre-Norman Conquest - 1066

History to: 1644

Of interest…

The pre-Conquest Lord of Sudbury was Ulfech, Edward the Confessor's steersman (pilot of his boat). After the conquest, a Norman, Osbern, becomes lord. From him, the manor passes in the Sudbury family until the 11th lord, Sir John Ragon. He is an attorney and career politician. He serves as a Knight of the Shire (MP) for Bedfordshire in 7 Parliaments. His son, Reynold, receives a Royal Commission to suppress a peasants' revolt in Bedfordshire. Reynold also serves as an MP, Justice of the Peace, and High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire. In the mid-15th century, Sudbury passes to Sir John Fray, Chief Baron of the Exchequer. The 16th lord, Sir Humphrey Stafford, holds Sudbury in the right of his wife, Katherine. In 1486, he is executed by King Henry for siding with Richard III.
Price: £3,850 to become the 22nd Lord and Lady of Sudbury

Lordship Title of Flanders

County: Warwickshire

Parish: Kingsbury

History from: 1199 - the reign of King John

History to: 1784 - the reign of George III

Of interest…

Hugh de Flaundres, whose ancestors came from Flanders, is the first Lord of Flanders Manor. Flanders stays with the de Flaundres family for 235 years before passing through several other families. The Muster Master (in charge of the army muster roll) of Coventry is holding Flanders in 1617. Just 10 years later, Charles I is desperately short of money and applies a “Forced Loan” on his subjects. William refuses to make his loan and appears before the Privy Council. William is later elected as MP for Coventry, made High Sheriff of Warwickshire, and made a Justice of the Peace. The last historic record for Flanders is 1784. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the 21st Lord and Lady of Flanders

Lordship Title of Billing

County: Northamptonshire

Parish: Great Billing

History from: 1066 - Norman Conquest

History to: 1553 - the reign of Edward VI

Of interest…

William the Conqueror combines the two Billing lordships and grants them to his half-brother, Robert Count of Mortain, as a reward for his support in the invasion fleet for which he supplied 120 ships and fought in the Battle of Hastings. The transition of Robert’s lands and titles to his son and heir, William, were not seamless. By 1100, William has still not received the land and titles of his father, and as a result his relationship with King Henry is strained. Henry offers him the hand in marriage of Mary of Scotland (daughter of King Malcolm III), which he refuses. Frustrated and angry, he leaves England for Normandy. There he joins forces with the Duke of Normandy, and together they attack several of King Henry’s holdings in Europe. They are captured at the Battle of Tinchebrai. William is imprisoned in the Tower of London, and all his lands and titles are stripped from him. Billing is granted to the D’Avranches family. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,850 to become the 9th Lord and Lady of Billing

Lordship Title of Titchmarsh or Knolles

County: Northamptonshire

Parish: Titchmarsh

History from: 973 - the reign of Edward the Martyr

History to: 1638 - the reign of Charles I

Of interest…

In the year 973, Titchmarsh Manor is first recorded as a forged charter from King Edgar to the Abbey of Peterborough. At Domesday, Titchmarsh is tenanted to Ascelin of Vatierville in Normandy, making him Lord of Titchmarsh. It remains with the Ascelin family for over 100 years. In the late 1300's, the lord (John 5th Baron of Lovel) is summoned to Parliament as an MP. John is one of the selected to swear fealty to Richard II at his coronation. He is also appointed Master of the King’s Hounds, and later becomes Keeper of the Castle of Devizes and the Forests of Melkesham, Cippenham, and Pensham. In 1405, John is made Knight of the Garter. Titchmarsh passes to William, whom is appointed Justice of the Peace. William assembles troops for Henry VI to fight against the rebellion of Jack Cade in Kent, and is appointed Constable of Wallingford Castle. In 1486, Sir Francis, now lord, organises two revolts to seize Henry VII. Both fail and he flees to Margaret of York in Flanders. The 23rd lord is knighted after arresting 2 Jesuits at Harrowden, the home of the notorious Catholic 4th Lord Vaux. The last lord, Sir John, serves on the parliamentary committees for religion, accountant’s oaths, Sunday observance, sheriff’s accounts, excommunication, and curate’s stipends (salaries). View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £4,700 to become the 26th Lord and Lady of Titchmarsh or Knolles

Lordship Title of Maryland

County: Northamptonshire

Parish: Syresham

History from: 1147 - the reign of King Stephen

History to: 1538 - the reign of King Henry VIII

Of interest…

Dating back to the 12th Century, the lordship and manor of Maryland was part of the original endowment for the Abbey of Biddlesden in Buckinghamshire. It was founded by Arnold de Bois, steward to the Earl of Leicester. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £4,150 to become the 3rd Lord and Lady of Maryland

Lordship Title of Clavells

County: Hampshire

Parish: Whippingham

History from: 1349 - the reign of Edward III

History to: 1772 - the reign of George III

Of interest…

Mid 13th C Henry de Clavill is holding an estate in Whippingham which we can assume is how the lordship was named. Much later in 1611 Richard Worsley is holding Clavells, he is knighted and later this year becomes a baronet. Sir Richard is elected to Parliament for Newport on the Isle of Wight, and later is appointed High Sheriff of Hampshire. He dies of smallpox in 1621, and his son Sir Henry inherits. Sir Henry is elected to the House of Commons , and in 1658 is appointed High Sheriff of Hampshire. 1772 is the last time Clavells is recorded as a manor disappearing from records. Full history available under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the 15th Lord and Lady of Clavells

Lordship Title of Knightlets

County: Northamptonshire

Parish: Old or Wold

History from: 1284 - The reign of Edward I

History to: 1608 - The reign of James I

Of interest…

In 1284 Robert de Hastings conveys two knight’s fees in Knightlets to William de Landwathe, this is the first record of Knightlets. After 1332 Knightlets passes to Andrew Landwath. After 1490 Knightlets (through marriage) is left to Sir Richard Knightley of Fawsley. In 1542 shortly before his death Sir Edmund gives Knightlets to Henry VIII in exchange for other property. King Henry passes Knightlets to Thomas Reeve of London and Giles Isham. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £2,800 to become the 18th Lord and Lady of Knightlets

Lordship Title of Franklyns or Franklands

County: Sussex

Parish: Wivelsfield

History from: 1322 - the reign of Edward II

History to: 1832 - the reign of William IV

Of interest…

Sir Edward Bray is in possession of Franklyns. Sir Edward had served as Captain on the famous ship Mary Rose. Owned by Col. Francis Warden Sergison in 1784.
Price: £2,800 to become the 16th Lord and Lady of Franklyns

Lordship Title of Shurton

County: Somerset

Parish: Stogursey

History from: Pre Conquest

History to: 1726 - the reign of George I

Of interest…

Held by the Sheriff of Somerset in 1086. At the beginning of the 13th century there was a lengthy dispute over ownership of the Lordship. By the turn of the 15th century the manor had been subenfeuded and was split into 5 pieces. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,850 to become the 28th Lord and Lady of Shurton

Lordship Title of Tewitfield

County: Lancashire

Parish: Warton with Lindeth

History from: 1246 - the reign of Henry III

History to: 1639 - the reign of Charles I

Of interest…

The Manor of Tewitfield is acquired by the Crofts of Dalton. In 1412 John Washington makes a grant of a tenement in Dalton to Sir John Croft. By the 16th century Anne Washington appears to be holding Tewitfield and other estates in her own right. Full history available under 'Further Information'.
Price: £4,150 to become the 14th Lord and Lady of Tewitfield

Lordship Title of Martock Sayes

County: Somerset

Parish: Martock

History from: 1321

History to: 1759

Of interest…

The 5th Lord Humphrey Stafford fought in the War of the Roses. He initially fights for the Lancastrians however in 1460 a storm sends his ship into Calais Harbour which is held by the Earl of Warwick, a Yorkist. He is swayed by him and transfers his allegiance to the Yorkist cause. A year later he fights at the Battle of Towton and is knighted by King Edward IV. He is also summoned to Parliament as a peer and appointed Steward of the Duchy of Cornwall. The following year the Earl of Devon is executed and Sir Humphrey is granted the majority of his lands. All this wealth came to Sir Humphrey because he was forced to harbour at Calais in a storm. I am sure if this had not occurred his fortunes would have been very different.
Price: £4,100 to become the 18th Lord and Lady of Martock Sayes

Lordship Title of Carton

County: Worcestershire

Parish: Bayton

History from: Pre 1066

History to: 1658

Of interest…

This lordship highlights 11th century England. Before the Norman Conquest Carton was held by Richard Scrope. Unlike the majority of lordships it is retained by him after. When he dies his son inherits Carton. As was the way at the time his son decided to not adopt the family name of Scrope but called himself Osbern Fitz Richard, fitz meaning son of. Osbern was one of the most influential men in Worcester. When William the Conqueror dies Osbern has a strained relationship with King William II Rufus. This culminates in his support of a rebellion led by Earl Robert who attacks Worcester.
Price: £3,250 to become the 22nd Lord and Lady of Carton.

Lordship Title of Charlton

County: Berkshire

Parish: Wantage

History from: 956

History to: 1743

Of interest…

An early title with history dating back to a grant by King Edwy to one of his ministers Wulfric. The lordship is granted again by King Ethelred in 982. Just before the Norman Conquest the lordship comes into the churches' hands held by the Bishop of Lichfield. In 1180 Charlton is held by William de Earley a chamberlain to Henry II. He dies leaving his 8 year old son John as his heir. He is put under the wardship of William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke, who knights him. In the 12th century it was common place for Earls to bestow knighthoods. Moving forward to the 15th century the lord is Sir Thomas de Carew who was also a feudal baron and was constable of a Welsh castle.
Price: £4,550 to become the 23rd Lord and Lady of Charlton

Lordship Title of Uplambourn

County: Berkshire

Parish: Lambourn

History from: 1066 - Pre-Norman Conquest

History to: 1728

Of interest…

A lordship with an infamous lord. Sir Henry de Bathe was the 7th Lord of Uplambourn and in 1249 becomes Chief Justice of England. Only a year later he is accused of perverting the course of justice. He is brought before Parliament who strip him of his office. He was also keeper of Gloucester Castle a role he also lost. He gets himself back into royal favour and in 1256 becomes Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. There is also a hero among the lords. The 13th lord Edward de Bohun drowns whilst trying to rescue a man. His son Humphrey becomes Constable of England being the 7th highest office of state. The lords also contain many individuals of noble birth including knights and even Earls of Hereford, Essex and Northampton.
Price: £3,500 to become the 27th Lord and Lady of Uplambourn

Lordship Title of Chaceley Grendour

County: Worcestershire

Parish: Chaceley

History from: Pre 1066

History to: 1778

Of interest…

Four lordships prior to the Norman Conquest are combined under one lordship owned by Urse Abetot, a Norman Feudal Baron. He built the first Worcester Castle. Urse is appointed High Sheriff of Worcestershire and plays a key role suppressing a rebellion during William the Conqueror's reign. Urse's daughter marries Walter de Beauchamp who holds the right to hunt wolves and foxes in the royal forests of Worcestershire. He is appointed High Sheriff of Worcestershire. His son and heir William is High Sheriff of Worcestershire but is also High Sheriff of Warwickshire, Gloucestershire and Herefordshire. In 1216 when Magna Carta was re-issued Walter Beauchamp, the 6th Lord of Chaceley Grendour, acts as a witness.
Price: £3,850 to become the 20th Lord and Lady of Chaceley Grendour

Lordship Title of Aston Bruley

County: Worcestershire

Parish: White Ladies Aston

History from: 1175

History to: 1611

Of interest…

It was not uncommon in the early Middle Ages for female lords to marry their cousins. This would keep valuable property within the family. The 8th lord Agnes de Bruley marries William Bruley. William becomes a Knight of the Shire for Oxfordshire. Before our present system of electing the commons a county would appoint several Knights of the Shire who would serve in Parliament representing the county. Their son John has a daughter Joan who marries John Danvers who himself serves as a Knight of the Shire for Oxfordshire. The 12th lord Sir William Danvers was an influential man of his time serving as a Member of Parliament, a Serjeant-at-Law (barrister) and Justice of the Court of Common Pleas (common law court).
Price: £3,250 to become the 20th Lord and Lady of Aston Bruley

Lordship Title of Forton

County: Lancashire

Parish: Cockerham

History from: 1066 - Pre-Norman Conquest

History to: 1666

Of interest…

The pre-Domesday Lord of Forton was Tosti, Earl of Northumbria. He was the brother of King Harold but was a completely different leader. Tosti maltreated lords and barons alike and the North was near to revolution. Tosti went on to raise a rebellion against King Harold and the loss of King Harold's forces fighting Tosti may well have been the tipping point to enable William the Conqueror his victory. The second Lord of Forton provided William the Conqueror with ships men and horses for the invasion and was rewarded with estates including Forton.
Price: £3,550 to become the 19th Lord and Lady of Forton

Lordship Title of Fennels Grove

County: Bedfordshire

Parish: Luton

History from: 1283

History to: 1611

Of interest…

The 6th Lord of Fennels Grove was the Duke of Bedford who vies with his brother the Duke of Gloucester to control England. Although he loses that battle he does become Governor of Normandy. He also fights at the Battle of Verneuil and captures Joan of Arc, handing her over tto the clergy for trial. The 8th Lord of Fennels Grove is appointed the Bishop of Lincoln, then Lord Chancellor and lastly Archbishop of York.
Price: £3,250 to become the 13th Lord and Lady of Fennels Grove.

Lordship Title of Kettlethorpe Hall

County: Rutland

Parish: Ketton

History from: 1301 - The reign of Edward I

History to: 1800 - The reign of George III

Of interest…

The first record of Kettlethorpe Hall is in 1301 when Robert Luterel is licenced to grant lands (a manor) in Ketton to the Priory of Sempringham, Lincolnshire. With the Act of Supremacy the Priory is dissolved, and the two manors are taken by the Crown. In 1545 the manor of Ketton and the manor or grange of Ketton called Kettlethorpe Hall (formerly belonging to Sempringham Priory) is granted to James Gunter and William Lewes. Kettlethorpe Hall is later conveyed to Sir John Harrington. Sir John is again made High Sheriff of Rutland, a post he has already held 3 times previously. Kettlethorpe Hall passes to son and heir James. James is elected as a Knight of the Shire for Rutland in 7 Parliamentary elections. He serves as a Justice of the Peace, and High Sheriff of Rutland 4 times. In 1565 James is knighted. Sir James serves as Rutland’s Commissioner for Musters (organising troops for war). By the 17th Century Kettlethorpe Hall is settled on Evers Armyn a Justice of the Peace with a successful legal career at Gray’s Inn, London. During the Civil War Evers lives in London but moves to Rutland to take up the role of Deputy Lieutenant of Rutland. View full history under 'Further Information'
Price: £4,150 to become the 15th Lord and Lady of Kettlethorpe Hall

Lordship Title of Twyfords

County: Middlesex

Parish: Tottenham

History from: 1380 - The reign of Richard II

History to: 1641 - The reign of Charles I

Of interest…

At 1412 John Twyford is holding a manor worth 100s. a year in Tottenham. During the latter years of the War of The Roses Sir John Elrington is holding Twyfords. He is made treasurer of King Edward IV’s household after accompanying Richard with an army to Scotland. Favour continues as Sir John is made a Knight of the Body (a personal attendant and courtier to a King of England). He attends King Richard’s coronation, and is appointed to the Commission of Oyer and Terminer (a court hearing the most serious criminal cases) for London. Sir John is made Constable of Windsor Castle. Much later Twyfords is held by Matthew de Questor, and his son, they share the office of Postmaster for Foreign Parts, a role granted by James I. View full history under 'Further Information'
Price: £3,300 to become the 16th Lord and Lady of Twyfords

Lordship Title of Pomeroy-La-Slowe

County: Wiltshire

Parish: Wingfield

History from: 1385 - The reign of Richard II

History to: 1675 - The reign of Charles II

Of interest…

Sir Thomas de Hungerford is granted free warren in the manor of Pomeroy-La-Slowe in 1385. He sits as a Member of Parliament for Wiltshire, and in 1386 he is recorded as the first to hold the office of Speaker. Pomeroy-La-Slowe passes to son and heir Walter whom is knighted by King Henry IV. Whilst serving with the English army Sir Walter enters a duel with King Charles VI of France, outside Calais, and beats the King. Sir Walter is made High Sheriff of Somerset and Dorset. He is made an ambassador to negotiate a treaty with Sigismund, King of the Romans. The following year Sir Walter fights at the Battle of Agincourt with 20 men-at-arms and 60 horse-archers. Sir Walter is appointed an Admiral of the Fleet under the Duke of Bedford. His success and favour continues as he is made a Knight of the Garter, Steward of the Household, and Treasurer of England. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,850 to become the 11th Lord and Lady of Pomeroy-La-Slowe

Lordship Title of Legra or Layer

County: Essex

Parish: Birch

History from: 1066 - Norman Conquest

History to: 1789 - The reign of George III

Of interest…

At 1066 Legra is held by Leofing the Saxon Lord. William the Conqueror replaces the Saxon Lord with Hugh de Montfort, Hugh had fought with William at the Battle of Mortemer in 1054, participated in the Council of Lillebonne in which the decision was made to invade England, and accompanied William in the invasion force supplying 50 ships and 60 knights. He was an absentee lord being stationed at William's fortress at Winchester, Hugh had to supply forces to Dover Castle. At the end of the 13th century Legra passed to Richard Birch, and remained in the Birch family for 200 years. Thomas Tey is holding Legra in 1502 he is elected as a Member of Parliament and serves as Justice of the Peace in Essex. After The Act of Supremacy Henry VIII created a new taxation for the church and it is Thomas who becomes Commissioner of Tenths of Spirtualties for Colchester. The last known Lord was Montagu Burgoyne in 1789, Legra is not recorded again. View full history under 'Further Information'
Price: £3,850 to become the 20th Lord and Lady of Legra or Layer

Lordship Title of Verney’s Fee

County: Oxfordshire

Parish: Aston Rowant

History from: 1066 - Norman Conquest

History to: 1424 - The reign of Henry VI

Of interest…

In 1086 Humphrey was the first lord of one knight's fee, later to be known as Verney's Fee, he held 12 other lordships in 12 other counties. The lordship passed to Gilbert de Bellewe and is held of the Honour of Wallingford offering fealty to Wallingford Castle. By the turn of the 13th century the lordship is split into two moieties, one of which is later sold to Ralph de Verney, which is how the lordship gains its distinctive name. The last confirmed date of Verney's Fee is 1424. View full history under 'Further Information'
Price: £3,300 to become the 15th Lord and Lady of Verney's Fee

Lordship Title of Hexted

County: Surrey

Parish: Lingfield

History from: 1101 - The reign of Henry I

History to: 1649 - The reign of Charles I

Of interest…

Hexted was held by the Heghsted family for over 200 years up until 1403 when it then came into the possession of Baron Cobham whose family home was Sterborough Castle, Lingfield. When Baron Cobham died (his son having predeceased him), the title passed to his grand-daughter, Margaret. Margaret was married to the 2nd Earl of Westmorland, Ralph, and in 1448 records show that they both conveyed Hexted to the College of St Peter in Lingfield. With the Dissolution of the monasteries the Crown took ownership of Hexted, and granted it to Sir Thomas Cawarden MP for Bletchingley and Master of Revels and Tents (responsible for organising royal festivities and tents for troops). Sir Thomas is made High Sheriff of Surrey and Sussex. Just 8 years later Sir Thomas is implicated in the Dudley plot to replace Queen Mary with Elizabeth and rob the exchequer. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £4,100 to become the 18th Lord and Lady of Hexted

Lordship Title of Brettgrave

County: Surrey

Parish: Epsom

History from: 1197 - The reign of Richard I

History to: 1652 - The Commonwealth of England

Of interest…

Sampson de Horton is Lord of Brettgrave in 1197. Changing hands through both the first and the second Barons’ Wars, by the early-14th Century Brettgrave was held by a John Imworth. By 1346 The Abbot of the time decided to take possession of Brettgrave by process of escheatment – where the legal transfer of a subordinate lord’s assets occurs because the lord has died with no heir . The Abbot then obtained a licence from the Crown to grant Brettgrave to Guy do Bryan, the younger, such that it was held of the king in chief. A short time later Brettgrave moved into the trust of Henry, Earl of Lancaster. Henry was created Duke of Lancaster thus Brettgrave began to move further up in the world. The Duke dies leaving no son so Brettgrave passes to his eldest daughter Maud (wife of the Duke of Bavaria). 38 years on Brettgrave is held by Henry who in addition to being Duke of Lancaster is also made Duke of Hereford. Henry usurps Richard II and becomes Henry IV and Brettgrave becomes part of the Duchy of Lancaster. Brettgrave passed quietly through several generations, until in 1626 when its final 28 years were full of financial and legal scandal. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £4,150 to become the 21st Lord and Lady of Brettgrave

Lordship Title of Entwistle

County: Lancashire

Parish: Bolton

History from: 1067 - The reign of William I

History to: 1670 - The reign of Charles II

Of interest…

Entwistle stayed in the Entwistle family for nearly three hundred and fifty years. By the mid 15th Century Entwistle passed to Sir Bertine Entwistle, Viscount and Baron of Bricqbec, Normandy. Sir Bertine was Bailiff of Constantin. He’d been knighted by Henry V at Agincourt in 1415. In 1455 Fighting for Henry VI at the Battle of St Albans, the battle that marked the start of the War of the Roses, Sir Bertine was wounded and died six days later. 100 years later Entwistle is the hands of Thurstan Tyldesley, MP for Lancashire and Receiver-General of the Isle of Man, when Thurstan died, his youngest son Edward Tyldesley took on Entwistle. At the outbreak of the English Civil War Thomas Tyldesley is holding Entwistle his name went down in history as being responsible for the first bloodshed of the Civil War. He is lieutenant colonel in the Battle of Edgehill the same year. The following year he earned a knighthood for his part in the Battle of Burton Bridge. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £4,150 to become the 21st Lord and Lady of Entwistle

Lordship Title of Younges

County: Bedfordshire

Parish: Westoning

History from: 1682 - The reign of Charles II

History to: 1803 - The reign of George III

Of interest…

In 1682 Henrietta Maria, Baroness Wentworth is Lord of Younges she is the grand-daughter of the 1st Earl of Cleveland. The Baroness is the mistress of the Duke of Monmouth the illegitimate son of King Charles II. In 1683 Monmouth was implicated in a plot that later came to be known as ‘The Rye House Plot’ to kill both his father and his uncle, James, Duke of York. The plot failed, and the couple flee to exile in Holland. There, Baroness Wentworth is received by the Prince of Orange Monmouth’s uncle James II comes to the throne and the Duke raises a further rebellion. Baroness Wentworth raises considerable funds for the rebellion through the sale of her jewellery. The rebellion fails, the Duke is sent to the Tower and executed. Baroness Wentworth returns to England. The following year Younges passes to Baroness Lovelace, the only surviving sister of the Earl of Cleveland. By 1754, Younges is held by William of Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Stafford. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the 8th Lord and Lady of Younges

Lordship Title of Shoddesden or Shadsden

County: Hampshire

Parish: Kimpton

History from: 1066 - The Norman Conquest

History to: 1756 - The reign of George II

Of interest…

Shoddesden was a holding of Queen Edith, the wife of Edward the Confessor, which made her Shoddesden’s overlord. The initial title holder was Aghmund (or Agemund) of Wellow, a Saxon thegn who held nine titles all in Hampshire, before the Normans changed the course of English history. By 1482 it was held by Thomas and Elizabeth Waite, referred to at the time as ‘that wanton wench’, Elizabeth Waite was rumoured to be the mistress of Edward IV. It is also believed that the Lady of Shoddesden was the mother of Arthur Plantagenet; Edward’s illegitimate son. It is Arthur’s large collection of correspondence in the Lisle Letters that makes his life one of the best-documented of his era. By 1561 the limelight had to shifted to Richard Kingsmill a colourful character who was very active in parliament and made Knight of Hampshire. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £4,150 to become the 24th Lord and Lady of Shoddesden or Shadsden

Lordship Title of Gostrode

County: Surrey

Parish: Chiddingfold

History from: Mid 13th Century

History to: 1774 - The reign of George III

Of interest…

Nigel le Gras of Littleton, Sheriff of Surrey, has an estate in Chiddingfold, he grants an estate in Gostrode to Alwin de Gostrode. In 1303 the 5th lord is murdered in Essex childless and so his brother Nicholas aged 22 inherits Gostrode. Gostrode later passes to John de Gostrode, the Bishop of Salisbury’s bailiff in Godalming. William Gostrode is pardoned for acquiring 7 shillings of rent in Chiddingfold from John de la Poyle without a licence. Towards the mid 16th Century Gostrode passes to the Peyto family but details of the family line cannot be found. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £2,800 to become the 25th Lord and Lady of Gostrode

Lordship Title of Penland

County: Buckinghamshire

Parish: Beaconsfield

History from: 1223 - The reign of Henry III

History to: 1612 - The reign of James I

Of interest…

Deep research has resulted in the understanding that the Lordship of Penland most likely derived its name from the Penne family. In 1308 John de la Penne brings an action to recover woods and rents for Penland, as sole owner of Penland. Sir John, is recorded in 1443 as being owner of Penland, he was appointed High Sheriff of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire, made Knight of the Shire, and then called to Parliament as a member. Almost 100 years later the Lord of Penland was a Member of Parliament and Master of the King’s Jewels. He soon fell out of favour and found himself in Fleet prison, having racked up debts of £28,000 through the accounts of his monastic properties – a huge sum for its time. He was pardoned by Queen Mary and appointed Sheriff of Oxfordshire and Berkshire to be her henchman. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,850 to become the 15th Lord and Lady of Penland

Lordship Title of Moorhouse

County: Somerset

Parish: Stogursey

History from: 1442 - The reign of Henry VI

History to: 1614 - The reign of James I

Of interest…

First recorded in 1442 Moorhouse is held under the lordship of Wick FitzPayn, one of the key lordships in the parish. At the turn of the 16th Century Moorhouse is held by John FitzJames Attorney-General of the Duchy of Lancaster, he is later appointed King Henry VIII's Attorney-General. John conducts the trial of the Duke of Buckingham for High Treason. Henry VIII places great trust in John and uses him to negotiate the marriage between Henry Percy, Duke of Northumberland and Mary Talbot daughter of the Earl of Shrewsbury. John is later knighted and is made Lord Chief Justice. It is John that leads the Judges in the procession to Westminster for the coronation of Anne Boleyn. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £2,500 to become the 8th Lord and Lady of Moorhouse

Lordship Title of Passelewes or Paslows

County: Buckinghamshire

Parish: Wavendon

History from: 1166 - the reign of Henry II

History to: 1801 - the reign of George III

Of interest…

First noted in 1166, William Passelewe is Lord of Passelewes Walter Giffard recorded as Overlord. From William, the lordship passed through a series of Passelewes, waving at Magna Carta and continuing through both the first and second Barons’ Wars intact, per se. However, by 1314 it had been split. By 1359 it had been passed to none less than the Chief Justice, Sir Henry Green, who later found himself dismissed for heinous breaches of trust. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,850 to become the 24th Lord and Lady of Passelewes or Paslows

Lordship Title of Halford

County: Warwickshire

Parish: Halford

History from: 1166 - the reign of Henry II

History to: 1824 - the reign of George IV

Of interest…

The first recorded reference of a Lordship for Halford is to a William Giffard 1166 who held two knight’s fees worth of land in the manor, these were granted to him by the Earl of Warwick. Halford was left to Andrew Giffard, the Baron of Funtell. Halford passed to Sir Robert de Burdet and later to Sir Robert de Holand. Sir Robert assists with the hunt for the fugitives from the Banastre Rebellion, he is asked by Edward II to bring horses and men to fight the Lancastrian rebellion. 12 days later he betrays the King and fights with the Lancastrians at the Battle of Boroughbridge. Sir Robert is imprisoned and his lands confiscated, he is then released and raids the Earl of Winchester’s estates only to be re-imprisoned in Warwick Castle. Sir Robert is moved to Northampton Castle, from which he escapes. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,850 to become the 8th Lord and Lady of Halford

Lordship Title of Thorp

County: Northamptonshire

Parish: Earls Barton

History from: 1066 - Norman Conquest

History to: 1580 - the reign of Elizabeth I

Of interest…

Robert de Bucy held Thorp at Domesday along with considerable estates in Northamptonshire and Leicestershire. In 1511 Thorp passes Mary, who is married to Sir William Parre who had been nominated as Sheriff of Northamptonshire the previous year. Sir William was popular at court being chosen to joust against King Henry on many occasions. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the 8th Lord and Lady of Thorp

Lordship Title of Barrow Lane

County: Somerset

Parish: Musgrove

History from: 1298 - the reign of Edward I

History to: 1786 - the reign of George III

Of interest…

At 1298 Stavordale Prior is recorded as owning Barrow Lane lordship and manor, but at this time it was called Barrow. During the reign of Henry VIII Barrow Lane passes to William Stourton, 7th Baron Stourton, who plays a key role in the Pilgrimage of Grace (The Yorkshire uprising). He bore the towel at the christening of Prince Edward (to become Edward VI). Later William accompanies Earl of Hertford to France where he is appointed Deputy of Newhaven. In 1548 his estate was granted to his son, Charles 8th Baron Stourton, who is asked by Mary Tudor to help with the succession. Charles is later tried, and found guilty of murder, and executed. Barrow Lane is last referred to in 1786. Full history available under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the 16th Lord and Lady of Barrow Lane

Lordship Title of Ash Boulogne

County: Somerset

Parish: Martock

History from: 1254 - the reign of Henry III

History to: 1622 - the reign of James I

Of interest…

During the reign of Henry III Richard de Boulogne is the first known owner of this manor in Ash. He is probably a descendant of the Count de Boulogne who was Lord of Martock in the last century. In 1288 The estate is referred to as “Essebolon” to be become Ash Boulogne, esse meaning ash. Ash Boulogne passes through several families up until 1622. Full history available under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the 16th Lord and Lady of Ash Boulogne

Lordship Title of Backenhoe

County: Bedfordshire

Parish: Thurleigh

History from: 1377 - the reign of Edward III

History to: 1860 - the reign of Queen Victoria

Of interest…

Lord of the Manor of Backenhoe Sir John Ragon dies in 1377 , his son, Sir Reginald Ragon inherits the lordship Sir Reginald has twice been Sheriff of Bedfordshire. Backenhoe is later transferred to John, Earl of Wiltshire, who in turn passes it to Edward, Edward is executed after being accused of listening to prophecies of the King's death. Colonel George Stuart is the last known owner of Backenhoe 1860,although it is now only classed as a farm. Full history available under 'Further Information'.
Price: £2,800 to become the 21st Lord and Lady of Backenhoe

Lordship Title of Franklins

County: Bedfordshire

Parish: Haynes

History from: 1463 - the reign of Edward IV

History to: 1704 - the reign of Queen Anne

Of interest…

The name of Franklins probably originated from the Franklin family. The only record of the family link with the parish is a John Franklin who has a protection revoked which had been granted for a year to go to Picardy, Northern France on the King’s service. In 1640 Franklins is held by Sir Oliver, a former Sheriff of Bedfordshire, he was a zealous Parliamentarian sitting in the Short Parliament and was later re-elected to sit in the Long Parliament. Full history available under 'Further Information'.
Price: £2,800 to become the 11th Lord and Lady of Franklins

Lordship Title of Little Holwell or Nether Holwell

County: Bedfordshire

Parish: Shillington with Lower Stondon and Little Holwell

History from: Post Norman Conquest - 1201

History to: 1532 - The reign of Henry VIII

Of interest…

Dating back to the turn of the 13th Century Stephen de Holwell conveys a virgate of land from his holding in Little Holwell to Ralph de Standon. In 1388 the Lord is found guilty of treason and Little Holwell escheats (reverts) to Crown ownership. Full history available under 'Further Information'.
Price: £2,800 to become the 15th Lord and Lady of Little Holwell or Nether Holwell

Lordship Title of Honydon or Camoys

County: Bedfordshire

Parish: Eaton Scoon

History from: 1302 - the reign of Edward !

History to: 1804 - the reign of George III

Of interest…

The first Lord of Honydon is William de Kirkeby in 1302. Towards the end of the 14th Century Sir Thomas Camoys makes a settlement from Honydon on Richard Braybrook, Bishop of London, and others. In 1804 James Dyson is said to have owned Honydon but there is no record of how this ownership may have come about. This is the last known reference to Honydon alias Camoys Full history available under 'Further Information'.
Price: £2,800 to become the 12th Lord and Lady of Honydon or Camoys

Lordship Title of Grimhill

County: Worcestershire

Parish: Hallow

History from: 957 - Pre Norman Conquest

History to: 1656 - The Commonwealth of England

Of interest…

In 1069 the Sherriff of Worcestershire invades the vill at Grimhill and fearing his power, the monks give Grimhill to him on the condition that he would discharge all service due for it to the King. In the 13th Century the Lordship in Grimhill is granted to Robert de Hallow. Robert is a mason, and leaves the country in pursuit of his business. The last recorded reference to Grimhill is in 1656. Full history available under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the next Lord and Lady of Grimhill

Lordship Title of Flyford Flavell

County: Worcestershire

Parish: Flyford Flavell

History from: Pre Domesday - 972

History to: The reign of King Henry VIII - 1544

Of interest…

Flyford Flavell is given to the Abbey of Westminster by Edward the Confessor. In 1086 Urso of Abetot is Lord of the Manor and also Sheriff of Worcestershire. The last record of the Lordship and Manor of Flyford Flavell is 1544.
Price: £2,800 to become the next Lord and Lady of Flyford Flavell

Lordship Title of Barbourne

County: Worcestershire

Parish: Claines

History from: 904 - Pre Domesday

History to: 1534 - the reign of King Henry VIII

Of interest…

Land at Barbourne is granted by Werefrith, Bishop of Worcester. In 1215 Walter Gray, Bishop of Worcester, recovers Barbourne from Ralph de Willington as the Sheriff of Worcester is commanded to give the Bishop seisin. The last known reference to the Lordship and Manor of Barbourne is in 1543. Full history available under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,150 to become Lord and Lady Barbourne

Lordship Title of Ellel

County: Lancashire

Parish: Ellel

History from: 1066 - Norman Conquest

History to: 1809 - the reign of George III

Of interest…

Ellel Pre-dates Domesday, at 1086 the Lord of the Manor is Roger of Poitou, and he is also tenant in chief. Robert de Washington is said to be in custody of the Manor of Ellel in 1331. By the turn of the 17th Century almost the entire Manor is now owned by the Molyneux family. Full history available under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the 20th Lord and Lady of Ellel

Lordship Title of Hartley Pellitot

County: Berkshire

Parish: Shinfield

History from: 1066 - Pre Conquest

History to: 1630 - the reign of Charles I

Of interest…

Held within the lands of Saxon lord Regnild of King Edward the Confessor. Later Hartley Pellitot falls into the Woodcock family and is treated as an appurtenance of Moor Place. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £2,800 to become the 8th Lord and Lady of Hartley Pellitot

Lordship Title of Withers Payne or Witherspawne or Chivers Hall

County: Essex

Parish: High Ongar

History from: 1494 - the reign of Henry VII

History to: 1926 - the reign of George v

Of interest…

Prior to The Act of Supremacy the lordship was held by William Payne. The two manors were separated, Chivers Hall being sold to a Gregory Yonge, grocer of London.
Price: £2,800 to become the 14th Lord and Lady of Withers Payne

Lordship Title of Hartley Dummer or Abor or Erbar

County: Berkshire

Parish: Shinfield

History from: 1066 - Norman Conquest

History to: 1858 - the reign of Queen Victoria

Of interest…

After the Conquest William retains Hartley Dummer as lord. There was confrontation with the Abbot of Reading over common pasture. In the 13th Century the manor and lordship is granted to the Bishop of Salisbury. In 1541 with dissolution of the of Reading Abbey the lordship and manor revert to the Crown. The lordship is last recorded in 1700. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,300 to become the 13th Lord and Lady of Hartley Dummer

Lordship Title of Upton Moels

County: Berkshire

Parish: Blewbury with Upton and Aston Upthorpe

History from: 1219 - the reign of Henry III

History to: 1484 - the reign of Richard III

Of interest…

The lord in 1264 took part in many Welsh Campaigns, one as Marshal. The 14th Century lord fights in both Saxony and Portugal and receives a barony peerage. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £2,800 to become the 14th Lord and Lady of Upton Moels

Lordship Title of Astwick

County: Bedfordshire

Parish: Astwick

History from: Pre 1066

History to: 1822 - the reign of George IV

Of interest…

Held at Domesday by Hugh de Beauchamp. Still in the Beauchamp family in 1265 John de Beauchamp is holding Astwick as part of the Barony of Bedford. John is slain at Evesham, and regarded as the last Feudal Baron of Bedford. Prior to 1495 the overlordship of Astwick is conveyed to John, Archbishop of Canterbury and other trustees by fine. View full history under 'Further Information'.
Price: £3,850 to become the 30th Lord and Lady of Astwick

Lordship Title of Fleetham

County: Yorkshire

Parish: Kirkby Fleetham

History from: Pre Norman Conquest

History to: 1670 - the reign of Charles II

Of interest…

There are two Manors in Fleetham owned by two Saxons, Gamel and Uctred pre-Domesday. After the conquest William grants Fleetham to Odo the Chamberlain, of Count Alan . The role was far more important than that of a mere servant as it was a position of extreme trust. Chamberlains throughout history were recipients of many valuable estates as rewards. In 1301 Henry le Scrope held Fleetham alongside Castle Bolton. Later the Earl of Sunderland conveys the manor to another. Fleetham manor is later owned by the Darcy's. View full history under 'Further Information'
Price: £3,300 to become 15th Lord and Lady of Fleetham

Lordship Title of Begwary

County: Bedfordshire

Parish: Eaton Socon

History from: Saxon times prior to the Norman Conquest of 1066

History to: 1667 - the reign of Charles II

Of interest…

In Saxon times prior to the conquest Begwary was owned by the Abbey of St Neots, it was a lordship within the Wyboston lordships, it takes its name from a hamlet that still exists. The Abbey retained it after the conquest but the lordship was made subordinate to Richard, son of Count Gilbert. This title is also known as Beggary or Goodwich. The Manor was seized after the murder of Richard de Braybrook, and later recovered by the Fitz Hugh family. View full history under 'Further Information'
Price: £3,300 to become the 19th Lord and Lady of Begwary

Lordship Title of Thorn

County: Somerset

Parish: Thorn

History from: 1066 - Pre Norman Conquest

History to: 1781 - the reign of George III

Of interest…

The Manor of Thorn is held by Cheneve prior to the Conquest. Drew is holding the Lordship and Manor of Thorn with the Count of Mortain as Overlord. Drew’s descendants, the de Montagues, later the Earls of Salisbury, hold the Manor in chief for ¼ knight’s fee, of their Manor of Shepton Montague. In 1303 The Coffin family take ownership of Thorn. By 1409 The Overlordship passes to Thomas, Earl of Salisbury. At the latter half of the 18th Century due to mergers with other Manors the Lordship and Manor of Thorn has lost their identity and are not recorded again. View full history under 'Further Information'
Price: £3,300 to become the next Lord and Lady of Thorn

Lordship Title of Stawell

County: Somerset

Parish: Stawell

History from: 1066 - Pre Norman Conquest

History to: 1604 - the reign of James I

Of interest…

Owned by Alward the Saxon at the Conquest it was given to the Abbey of Glastonbury St Mary by William the Conqueror. The Lordship for most of its known history was owned by locals who took their names from the Lordship. View full history under 'Further Information'
Price: £3,300 to become the 24th Lord and Lady of Stawell

Lordship Title of Hilton

County: North Yorkshire

Parish: Hilton

History from: 1066 - Pre Domesday

History to: 1541 - the reign of Henry VIII

Of interest…

Owned by Alvar the Saxon until the Conquest when the Lordship was seen as being of significant importance to stay as a Crown Lordship. At the Dissolution Drax Priory is said to have been holding no lands in Hilton and it is assumed that they had a Mesne Lordship and did not hold the Manor. Held by two knights during its history, Sir Thomas Percy and Sir James Strangways. View full history under 'Further Information'
Price: £3,850 to become 10th Lord and Lady of Hilton

Lordship Title of Mossbury

County: Bedfordshire

Parish: Tempsford

History from: 1086 - the reign of William I

History to: 1803 - the reign of George III

Of interest…

Pre-Conquest Alwin Devil is the Saxon Lord prior to 1066. The Overlord is the Bishop of Lincoln. William de Carun is the first Lord of the Manor which is measured as 1 hide 1 ¾ virgate of land. Mossbury is transferred to Nicholas de Cernes from whence it derives its alternative name (Sarnes). In 1428 the Bishop of Lincoln gives up Overlordship to the CrownThe history spans across seven hundred years providing connections with numerous old families. View full history under 'Further Information'
Price: £3,300 to become 17th Lord and Lady of Mossbury