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Posts Tagged ‘William the Conqueror’

On this day 12th November, Plymouth…

1439 – Plymouth, England, becomes the first town incorporated by the English Parliament. The English Parliament / The Parliament of England is key to our research here at Manorial Counsel as – The Parliament of England  was the legislature of the Kingdom of England . In 1066, William the Conqueror  introduced the feudal system, by which he sought the advice of a…

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On this day 14th October- Not a good day in history for some Monarchs…

Not a good day in history for some Monarchs… 1066– Norman Conquest, Battle of Hastings – In England on Senlac Hill, seven miles from Hastings, the Norman forces of William the Conqueror defeat the English army and kill King Harold II of England.  A pinnacle moment for William the Conqueror, and an event that changed the course of our history.  William introduced a management structure called ‘feudalism’ Many…

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On this day 27th September

1066– Duke William II of Normandy later William the Conqueror and his army set sail from the mouth of the River Somme, beginning the Norman Conquest of England. The lands, manors and titles of the resisting English elite were confiscated, and awarded to Williams closest supporters and followers, as expected they received lands and titles in return for their service in the invasion.  Although…

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Domesday Book – To bring the Barons in line?

Domesday Book

Earlier this week we wrote a blog highlighting some of the issues historians have in interpreting the Domesday Books.  One of the reasons not mentioned in that article is a means of maximising taxation from the barons and just as important limiting the wealth and power of the barons. In the Domesday Books there are…

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What was the Domesday Book for?

Domesday Book

Its purpose may never be known. However over the years our reasoning has changed its purpose several times.  This confusion is not a new thing as it is believed that as early as the mid 12th century, only 70 years after it was commissioned, confusion had already started.  Records then imply that the Domesday Books…

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